{"__v":1,"_id":"568e6cbb46cf4b0d00578f43","category":{"__v":2,"_id":"568e6b65d892e80d00a5d37a","pages":["568e6cbb46cf4b0d00578f43","56aa053d257fbc0d00d476cf"],"project":"5613d8fc6a092921004c30b9","version":"5613d8fc6a092921004c30bc","sync":{"url":"","isSync":false},"reference":false,"createdAt":"2016-01-07T13:43:01.816Z","from_sync":false,"order":5,"slug":"publishers","title":"Publishers"},"parentDoc":null,"project":"5613d8fc6a092921004c30b9","user":"5613d895443514170060dba9","version":{"__v":10,"_id":"5613d8fc6a092921004c30bc","project":"5613d8fc6a092921004c30b9","createdAt":"2015-10-06T14:21:48.908Z","releaseDate":"2015-10-06T14:21:48.908Z","categories":["5613d8fd6a092921004c30bd","5614ef94a4ccab0d00e698b5","5614ef9abeee6f0d009df1a2","5614efb2a4ccab0d00e698b6","5624cb406ff1010d009b1611","5624ce8772ac510d00e4918b","5624e1195a86b423009462ec","568e68490844350d002ffa47","568e6b010844350d002ffa4a","568e6b65d892e80d00a5d37a"],"is_deprecated":false,"is_hidden":false,"is_beta":false,"is_stable":true,"codename":"","version_clean":"1.0.0","version":"1.0"},"updates":[],"next":{"pages":[],"description":""},"createdAt":"2016-01-07T13:48:43.123Z","link_external":false,"link_url":"","githubsync":"","sync_unique":"","hidden":false,"api":{"results":{"codes":[]},"settings":"","auth":"required","params":[],"url":""},"isReference":false,"order":0,"body":"As a publisher, you know the effectiveness of  [DOIs](doc:what-is-a-doi) for maintaining the scholarly record allowing effective citation of outputs ranging from journal articles to datasets. This is shown through the continued support of [Crossref](http://crossref.org/). DOIs are one example of [Persistent Identifiers](https://project-thor.readme.io/docs/introduction-to-persistent-identifiers) (PIDs).\n\nIncreasingly, there is a recognition of the value of PIDs for other entities in the scholarly ecosystem, for example,  [ORCID iDs](doc:explaining-orcid) provide a unique identifier for authors allowing their contributions to be more easily connected together. As a bridge between, author, readers, funders, and organizations, publishers play an important role in adoption of PIDs. \n\nBeyond being beneficial for the wider ecosystem, PIDs can help you in making submissions systems, editorial, and peer-review more efficient, for example, by pre-populating author details.  Additionally, PIDs can help you offer novel services.","excerpt":"","slug":"introduction-for-publishers","type":"basic","title":"Introduction for publishers"}

Introduction for publishers


As a publisher, you know the effectiveness of [DOIs](doc:what-is-a-doi) for maintaining the scholarly record allowing effective citation of outputs ranging from journal articles to datasets. This is shown through the continued support of [Crossref](http://crossref.org/). DOIs are one example of [Persistent Identifiers](https://project-thor.readme.io/docs/introduction-to-persistent-identifiers) (PIDs). Increasingly, there is a recognition of the value of PIDs for other entities in the scholarly ecosystem, for example, [ORCID iDs](doc:explaining-orcid) provide a unique identifier for authors allowing their contributions to be more easily connected together. As a bridge between, author, readers, funders, and organizations, publishers play an important role in adoption of PIDs. Beyond being beneficial for the wider ecosystem, PIDs can help you in making submissions systems, editorial, and peer-review more efficient, for example, by pre-populating author details. Additionally, PIDs can help you offer novel services.